Let ’em Lead: Unleash the Power of Your B-Suite | Recorded Webinar

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60 minutes

Middle managers are essential for increasing engagement, productivity, and profitability in any organization. They are close to the frontline and can gain insight into a company’s pain points to identify what needs to be recognized or repaired. They can also translate the vision and mission of the organization into practical terms for the frontline workers to help motivate and engage them.

In this session, international multi-award-winning speaker and author Sally Foley-Lewis will share the 3 T’s to letting your middle managers lead with confidence, influence, and effectiveness!

Attendees will learn:

  • Learn the value of permission, feedback, and expectations for strengthening the relationship between the C-Suite and the B-Suite.
  • Respectfully challenge assumptions to ensure no one is left wondering, which leads to guessing or procrastination.
  • Define what great success looks like so expectations are clear.
  • Appreciate the confidence-building approach of starting small and trialing innovative ideas that will add value to the organization.
  • Discover that celebrating wins is more than a cake and coffee! 

Who should attend:

  • Training and HR professionals
  • Independent consultants
  • Managers delivering training 

Presenter

Sally Foley-Lewis

Sally Foley-Lewis inspires skills managers to be high performing, purposeful and productive. Obsessed with leadership and professional development that ensures people reach their potential. Sally’s presentations and programs positively impact your confidence, leadership and results.

  • 2021 University of Southern Queensland – Outstanding Alumnus of the Year – Business and Enterprise
  • 2021 A.I. Influential Businesswoman – Winner – Most Inspirational Leadership Development Specialist (Australia)
  • 2021 ROAR Success Awards – Silver Leadership Award
  • 2020 Gold Stevie Award – Female Entrepreneur of the Year – Business Services
  • 2020 Bronze Stevie Award – Female Entrepreneur of the Year – Consumer Services
  • 2020 Breakthrough Speaker of the Year by Professional Speakers Australia
  • 2019 finalist for Australian Learning Professional of the Year
  • 2019 Australian Champion Sole Trader winner – Australian Small Business Champion Awards
  • One of the 25 LinkedIn Top Voices for Australia for 2018 for her thought leadership.

She is a global professional speaker, and has authored multiple books. The drive to support and skill managers comes from her own CEO and senior leadership experiences. Sally delivers presentations, keynote speeches, workshops and coaching – live online and face-to-face – to skill managers, boost productivity and self-leadership.

Blending 20+ years of working with a diverse range of people and industries, in Germany, the Middle East, Asia and across Australia Sally has extensive qualifications, a wicked sense of humor and an ability to inspire and make people feel at ease. Sally’s your first choice for mastering skills, facilitating action and achieving results.

Connect with Sally on LinkedInFacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube and at sallyfoleylewis.com.

Sponsor

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HRDQstore.com

This webinar is sponsored by HRDQstore.com and is based upon research of our published training tools. For more than 40 years HRDQ has been a provider of research-based training resources for classroom, virtual, and online soft-skills training. We offer learning resources to help retain employees and clients, make better decisions, improve performance, and much more.

Learn more at HRDQstore.com >>

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One Response

  1. And we do have a question here.
    53:36
    It said, how do I make sure I don’t become a bad boss? The others have demanded.
    53:41
    How do I make sure, I don’t think I’m a bad boss, where then, you know, others have to manage?
    53:49
    Oh?
    53:50
    get feedback.
    53:51
    I’d start with feedback, and start with someone who knows you really well, and is, and you need to set it up so that you assign to them, I’m worried about my leadership, or I’m wanting to make sure I be a great leader, I’m on a lifelong journey of improving my leadership. Could you please give me feedback about X?
    54:20
    So, and the reason why I say this is because you don’t want to necessarily give someone permission to just cool put the fire hydrant on and just go at you because I think it’s really important that you think about the elements of your leadership that you didn’t. You want feedback on.
    54:42
    What is it specifically that you’re worried about, becoming a bad boss about, that you should be asking for?
    54:49
    Now, for example, communications are really big, but so fundamental.
    54:56
    So, if there’s an element of your communication that you’re worried about, what’s the element, for example?
    55:06
    Is there something about the way you lead team meetings?
    55:11
    OK, so that’s how you can, that’s how you can get more specific, and then say to your trusted colleague, or even to your two IC, if you’re a Senior Leader, to someone in your base way. And it’s a private conversation, and you just, you just can say to them, I want to make sure that I’m the best leader I convey, and I’d really like you to give me some feedback about how I run meetings.
    55:35
    Just anything about the meetings that I run. Can you just give me some feedback from your perspective, and then you need to then?
    55:46
    And listen.
    55:47
    And don’t shoot the messenger, because you might not like what they hear, but, but it’s valuable feedback and this, and the thing is, you then get to choose what you do with that feedback.
    55:58
    As well as you get to, um, hear what it’s really like from from the other side of the, the, from the receiving end of, of what you do, which is incredibly valuable, and then please thank them, because it won’t be easy, Particularly, if they report to, generally. Please thank them.
    56:20
    Hopefully that helps. And that answers that question. I’m sorry, I missed the question.
    56:24
    Great! And then the 1, 1 more question here today, and we have time for is, do you have any tips for micro managers?
    56:35
    Don’t get me started, All right? Let’s roll our sleeves up with our wonderful micro managers. Where do you think micro managing comes from?
    56:44
    So to me, the way I say in the way I’ve worked with and helped those who micromanage is they don’t have a sense of control.
    56:53
    And where does that come from. It comes from a range of different things going on. And fundamentally, one of those things is trust.
    57:02
    And if they don’t have trust, then we’ve got to look at the relationships.
    57:06
    So if someone’s a mock our manager, and I would be encouraging that marker manager to actually, it’s almost, it’s like, let’s start again. Let’s start from the beginning. What are your relationships like with your people?
    57:21
    And build those trusting relationships, because when there’s trust, you won’t want to take over. You won’t want to necessarily step into and step onto the toes of others. So, that’s one element of trust of the micro managing is trust.
    57:38
    Then, when I went to micromanage a thinks they’re delegating, when in actual fact that they’re not the meddling and then the dictating than what they haven’t done is I haven’t set the delegation up properly.
    57:51
    And I don’t know if you remember the, this image. Let me go back.
    57:57
    The image. slow is fast. Again, we rushed through things and we don’t actually set ourselves up for success.
    58:05
    And so, one of the things I think is really important is the, the setup of delegation is done why to haphazardly.
    58:15
    A lot of leaders just dump and run what I call a drive by delegating delegation, and so they don’t actually have a star, a conversation that helps the person set up a plan, set in milestones to talk about when they’ll check in with each other.
    58:34
    And so naturally, someone who’s going to be a micromanager is going to have a heightened level of stress because they’ve walked away from thinking that I’ve delegated, but there’s so many more questions.
    58:45
    There’s so many gaps, But what if they can’t do this? What did I do that? What does that it is? What am I going to get it done? Who’s going to do this?
    58:50
    And said, I haven’t actually created out an effective plan with the person and that then just leaves a whole lot of space for stress and to trigger the micro manager. So does that help answer that question about micro manages where we don’t have a lot of time but I could talk about Margaret manages for a long time.

Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

One Response

  1. And we do have a question here.
    53:36
    It said, how do I make sure I don’t become a bad boss? The others have demanded.
    53:41
    How do I make sure, I don’t think I’m a bad boss, where then, you know, others have to manage?
    53:49
    Oh?
    53:50
    get feedback.
    53:51
    I’d start with feedback, and start with someone who knows you really well, and is, and you need to set it up so that you assign to them, I’m worried about my leadership, or I’m wanting to make sure I be a great leader, I’m on a lifelong journey of improving my leadership. Could you please give me feedback about X?
    54:20
    So, and the reason why I say this is because you don’t want to necessarily give someone permission to just cool put the fire hydrant on and just go at you because I think it’s really important that you think about the elements of your leadership that you didn’t. You want feedback on.
    54:42
    What is it specifically that you’re worried about, becoming a bad boss about, that you should be asking for?
    54:49
    Now, for example, communications are really big, but so fundamental.
    54:56
    So, if there’s an element of your communication that you’re worried about, what’s the element, for example?
    55:06
    Is there something about the way you lead team meetings?
    55:11
    OK, so that’s how you can, that’s how you can get more specific, and then say to your trusted colleague, or even to your two IC, if you’re a Senior Leader, to someone in your base way. And it’s a private conversation, and you just, you just can say to them, I want to make sure that I’m the best leader I convey, and I’d really like you to give me some feedback about how I run meetings.
    55:35
    Just anything about the meetings that I run. Can you just give me some feedback from your perspective, and then you need to then?
    55:46
    And listen.
    55:47
    And don’t shoot the messenger, because you might not like what they hear, but, but it’s valuable feedback and this, and the thing is, you then get to choose what you do with that feedback.
    55:58
    As well as you get to, um, hear what it’s really like from from the other side of the, the, from the receiving end of, of what you do, which is incredibly valuable, and then please thank them, because it won’t be easy, Particularly, if they report to, generally. Please thank them.
    56:20
    Hopefully that helps. And that answers that question. I’m sorry, I missed the question.
    56:24
    Great! And then the 1, 1 more question here today, and we have time for is, do you have any tips for micro managers?
    56:35
    Don’t get me started, All right? Let’s roll our sleeves up with our wonderful micro managers. Where do you think micro managing comes from?
    56:44
    So to me, the way I say in the way I’ve worked with and helped those who micromanage is they don’t have a sense of control.
    56:53
    And where does that come from. It comes from a range of different things going on. And fundamentally, one of those things is trust.
    57:02
    And if they don’t have trust, then we’ve got to look at the relationships.
    57:06
    So if someone’s a mock our manager, and I would be encouraging that marker manager to actually, it’s almost, it’s like, let’s start again. Let’s start from the beginning. What are your relationships like with your people?
    57:21
    And build those trusting relationships, because when there’s trust, you won’t want to take over. You won’t want to necessarily step into and step onto the toes of others. So, that’s one element of trust of the micro managing is trust.
    57:38
    Then, when I went to micromanage a thinks they’re delegating, when in actual fact that they’re not the meddling and then the dictating than what they haven’t done is I haven’t set the delegation up properly.
    57:51
    And I don’t know if you remember the, this image. Let me go back.
    57:57
    The image. slow is fast. Again, we rushed through things and we don’t actually set ourselves up for success.
    58:05
    And so, one of the things I think is really important is the, the setup of delegation is done why to haphazardly.
    58:15
    A lot of leaders just dump and run what I call a drive by delegating delegation, and so they don’t actually have a star, a conversation that helps the person set up a plan, set in milestones to talk about when they’ll check in with each other.
    58:34
    And so naturally, someone who’s going to be a micromanager is going to have a heightened level of stress because they’ve walked away from thinking that I’ve delegated, but there’s so many more questions.
    58:45
    There’s so many gaps, But what if they can’t do this? What did I do that? What does that it is? What am I going to get it done? Who’s going to do this?
    58:50
    And said, I haven’t actually created out an effective plan with the person and that then just leaves a whole lot of space for stress and to trigger the micro manager. So does that help answer that question about micro manages where we don’t have a lot of time but I could talk about Margaret manages for a long time.

Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *